T-CUP : There is no such a thing as "T-CUP CHIHUAHUA" in the breed standard.  Smaller chihuahuas should be described as "Tiny", "Little", "Small", or by actual weight instead.  Only questionable breeders label their dogs "T-cup" to give buyers an impression that the dog is special, rare and/or expensive.  "Chihuahua Club of America" doesn't endorse the use of the word "T-Cup". In reality, "so-called T-cups" can grow up to be bigger than what we consider "average" or "standard" show size.  Real tiny ones could often have health reasons (for example, Hydrocephalus) why they are too small.  Healthy 4 to 6 lbs. dogs are strongly recommended for family pets, especially with children. T-cups are everywhere.  It's a market scum !  Buyers should take time to learn about the breed and to buy one from reputable breeders which can be found by contacting local chihuahua club and all breed club in your area.

Blue Chihuahuas : Blue is rare because it is associated with auto-immune problems.  True blue dogs, which are actually dilutes, tend to have clumping of white blood cells.  This phenomenon is associated with the dilution of pigment.  Problems such as Alapecha (hair loss) manifest as a result.  While the color may be pretty and it can be healthy, it is generally difficult to retain health when dealing with true blues.  Most dogs that are called blue are actually due to the G series, the graying gene, and a gray and blue can look alike, phenotypically, but real blues, dilutes (which are found in doberman and chihuahuas), are subject to the health problems that go with the color. Blue Chihuahuas are not something you want to pay "Extra" for.

Merle Chihuahuas : Merle is NOT a color that has been in Chihuahuas for long.  It has most likely been brought into this breed by cross breeding to others such as Dachshund or Sheltie.  The color pattern is believed to be related to health problems such as but not limited to deafness, blindness, and PRA.  Most of Merles are bred by backyard breeders and oversized.

Molera : It is normal for chihuahua puppies to be born with MOLERA (soft spot) on the top of the skull and it might never closes.  It's a special characteristic of the breed.  The breed standard accepts them with or without molera.

Umbilical Hernia : A hernia is a protrusion or bulge of a part of the body tissue, fat, or an organ through an abnormal opening of the surrounding tissues.  There are numerous types of hernias, each type named after its affected area.  A hernia which can be pushed back into the abdomen is called reducible.  Hernias which are not reducible are called incarcerated.  If the blood supply to an incarcerated hernia is pinched off the hernia becomes strangulated.  A strangulated hernia is an emergency situation and must be brought to the immediate attention of your veterinarian.  An umbilical hernia is the most common type of hernia found in puppies.  In the case of umbilical hernias, a portion of fat or internal organs protrudes through an incompletely closed umbilical ring.  Umbilical hernias may be present at birth, or may be acquired.  The most common means of acquiring an umbilical hernia is as as result of the umbilical cord being severed too close to the abdominal wall.  IN most cases umbilical hernias are small and reduce as the puppy grows.  Generally, by the time the pup is six months old the umbilical hernia will shrink and disappear on its own.  If the pup has large hernia, or one that can be pushed into the abdomen with a finger, consult your veterinarian regarding possible surgical repair.

This is the most commonly used chart and remarkably accurate from the age of 10 weeks upwards.  Weights before the age of 8 weeks are liable to be inaccurate.  These average weights can be a useful guide, but not to be mistaken as a guarantee.  The chart only goes up to 6 lbs. which is a maximum weight limit in show ring.  Almost all of my puppies stay within AKC show standard.  However, Chihuahuas bred by non-show breeders could exceed this weight limit, sometimes by far.  To estimate mature sizes, take the weight at 13 weeks (3 months) old, and double it. 

Birth

2 1/2 oz

2 3/4 oz

3 oz

3 1/2 oz

4 oz

4 1/4 oz

4 1/2 oz

5 oz

5 1/2 oz

1 week

3 3/4

4

5

5 1/2

6 1/2

7

8

9

9 1/2

2 weeks

5

5 1/2

6 1/2

7

9

10

11

12 1/2

13 1/2

3 weeks

6

7

8

9

11

13

14

16

17 1/2

4 weeks

7

8

9 1/2

11

13

15

17

19

21

5 weeks

8

9

11

13

15

17

19 1/2

22

24

6 weeks

9

11

12 1/2

15

17 1/2

20

22

24

27

7 weeks

10

12

14 1/2

17

19 1/2

22

24 1/2

27

30

8 weeks

11

13

16

19

21 1/2

24

27

29

33

9 weeks

12

15

17 1/2

20

23

26

29

32

35

10 wks

13

16

19

22

25

28

31

34

38

11 wks

14

17

21

24

27

31

34

37

42

12 wks

15

19

22

26

30

33

37

41

45

13 wks

16

20

24

28

32

36

40

44

49

14 wks

17

22

26

30

34

39

43

47

52

15 wks

19

23

28

32

37

41

46

51

56

16 wks

20

25

30

34

39

44

49

54

59

17 wks

21

26

31

36

41

46

51

57

62

18 wks

22

28

33

37

43

48

54

60

65

19 wks

23

29

34

39

44

50

56

62

67

20 wks

24

30

35

41

46

52

58

64

70

21 wks

25

31

36

42

48

54

60

66

72

22 wks

25

32

37

43

49

56

62

68

74

23 wks

26

33

38

44

50

57

64

70

76

24 wks

26

33

39

45

51

58

65

71

78

25 wks

27

34

40

46

52

59

66

72

79

26 wks

27

34

40

47

53

60

67

73

80

18 mo.

2 lb

2 1/2 lb

3 lb

3 1/2 lb

4 lb

4 1/2 lb

5 lb

5 1/2 lb

6 lb

Weight Chart

Breed Information